Preservation of U.S. History

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In the midst of the national debate about confederate statues, we must take the discussion to new heights here in metro Atlanta.  As an Atlanta native who has lived all over country, it is unfortunate that the other cities valued and preserved their historic structures while Atlanta continues to tear them down without a second thought. Initially I thought it was because there are so many people here from other places that they don’t care??  Yet, at least half of our current City Council members (many have served 2-4 terms or 8-16 years), the Council President and the Mayor are natives.  Hmmm. So, how could this continue to happen on their watch??

A recent column written by metro area writer Maria Saporta, complete with reader comments, asks several other good questions about preserving local Atlanta history.  This history includes the precious home of Grace Towns Hamilton, the first Black woman elected to the Georgia Legislature and daughter of George Alexander Towns; an educator and man my elementary school was named after.

Grace Towns Hamilton in the House Chamber of the Georgia Legislature.  (Source GA History Center)

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Grace Towns Hamilton House in grave need of preservation. (Photo by Brandy Morrison.)

http://www.atlantapreservationcenter.com/place_detail?id=15&pt=1

Maria’s article also includes African American buildings as Morris Brown’s Gaines Hall and Atlanta Life Insurance Company’s first home on Auburn Avenue. I applaud Maria for pulling together this important story because the sale and tearing down of two historic Atlanta churches to make room for a football stadium still makes me sick to my stomach.  And it makes me question why other historic churches all along Peachtree Street were built around like the church across from Colony Square.  And, how about the church next door to the Fulton County Courthouse on Pryor or the one across the street from the State Capitol on Washington…just to name a few.

I believe you will enjoy this article. And, I hope you will think of how you might be a part of a movement to preserve the African American and Civil Rights structures included in the article as well others across the state.

https://saportareport.com/forget-symbols-confederacy-instead-lets-preserve-african-american-heritage/

In conclusion, here is information about Pascal’s Restaurant.  It’s where I walked on rare occasions after being on the tennis courts all day at Washington Park, if I had money for one of their famous fried chicken dinners in the 1970’s.

 

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Paschal Brother’s Restaurant & Hotel. Owned and used by Clark Atlanta as a student dorm until 2004.

http://socialshutter.blogspot.com/2013/01/atlantas-warped-civil-right-legacy-sad.html?m=1

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This is an important quote from the 2013 article in the link above about how Paschal’s can be preserved;

“If the city of Atlanta can consider sinking money into a new football stadium to draw tourists to the area, shouldn’t it also invest in restoring Paschal’s and its surrounding neighborhood, which may have even greater tourist potential?”

The question now is:  Do we care enough to preserve it and similar important historic structures??

Thanks in advance for leaving your comments and sharing this blog. The more people who know, means more who might help with a full scaled preservation project.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Statute to Be Unveiled

There has been a lot of talk across our nation about taking down statues.  And, about taking down confederate flags across the south.  As we move forward to embrace our rich yet shameful, violent and inhumane history; we need to set a policy and move forward.

As we continue to recognize and celebrate our nation’s humanitarians, I am excited about a new statue.  It is the Dr. M.L. King, Jr. statue that will be unveiled at the Georgia State Capitol on Monday, August 28, 2017 at 10:00am. The King statue will be the first one of a non-legislator.  And, being a an international humanitarian who practiced and promoted non-violent protests, it is not an accident that this dedication is occurring  in the midst of the debate  over Confederate statutes.