Happy 90th Birthday to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin from 2018.

Today Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Would have been 90 years old.

Here are some MLK,Jr questions for you and your circle of influence:

How will you celebrate his birthday today or next Monday, January 21, the day the King National Holiday is celebrated?

Will you attend the Annual Program at Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he served as Co-Pastor and his father served as Pastor?

Will you participate in a MLKJr Day of Service?

Will you attend one of the many marches or other celebrations across the region?

Will you take time to learn more about MLKing,Jr with your circle of friends and family?

Will you read one of the many books about him?

Will you read one of his speeches (google Dr. MLKing, Jr. speeches) other than his “I Have A Dream Speech”?  Or, watch any of his less famous, yet just as important, speeches or interviews online?

To study King, his life and works will amaze you.  He was a brilliant visionary.  You will find that many of his speeches, letters and other works seem timeless. Some of them are still appropriate today…in 2019.

How do you believe things might be different if he were still alive?

What things did he envision during his lifetime do you believe still need to be fulfilled?

 

 

Planetarium Article Reveals Recent Developments

Thanks to Maggie Lee for taking the time to research and write this article.

A driveway in front of what's now Harper-Archer Middle School in far west Atlanta. It opened as Harper High School. Credit: Maggie LeeWhat’s now Harper-Archer Middle School in far west Atlanta opened as Harper High School. Credit: Maggie Lee“You’d go in this room,” she said, “looking up at the night sky, they’d put up stars, the Big Dipper, they’d tell you all about that, the comets racing through … How could you dare take that experience away from kids?”But the planetarium at what’s now Harper-Archer Middle School on Atlanta’s western edge closed nearly 20 years ago. Williams and others want it re-opened.They talk about how these places can be used to as a sort of immersive classroom to teach not just astronomy, but chemistry, physics, history and more. Or as theaters for music, performance or visual art display.In the mid-20th century, a United States spooked by Soviet space advances started pouring big money into science education — which included planetariums.DeKalb schools took the feds up on that and put money toward Fernbank, which is one of the largest planetariums in the country, and which is part of a larger science center.Atlanta Public Schools also wanted planetariums — a brief mention in a newspaper clipping from 1972 has the school superintendent boasting about three of them. Seems the other two were at Northside and the former Fulton High School — now site of Dobbs Elementary.But fast forward to the 2001-2002 school year: that’s when Jim Summers puts the end for Harper-Archer’s planetarium.“It was really no one person’s fault. It was just that the school system ran out of money and something had to go,” said Summers, the last director of the planetarium.The building still exists, but it has no equipment.Summers is still a witness for what a planetarium can be, but he emphasized that word can.The room depends on animation by an educator — a real person who teaches to the student’s curriculum.“A planetarium with well-trained and well-motivated hands is a valuable tool … it can open a lot of doors that don’t get opened any other way,” said Summers.“Whenever a door opens for one of these children, they have an opportunity for a life that they didn’t have before,” Summers said. “Not just that they will learn an understanding of science, but that there is another world out there other than the one they encounter every day. And that is what education is ultimately all about.”The Fernbank planetarium opens for evening and weekend community programs. Credit: Kelly Jordan ” data-medium-file=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?fit=224%2C300&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?fit=769%2C1030&ssl=1″ src=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?resize=224%2C300&ssl=1″ alt=”The Fernbank planetarium opens for evening and weekend community programs. Credit: Kelly Jordan” width=”222″ height=”297″ srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?resize=224%2C300&ssl=1 224w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?resize=768%2C1029&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?resize=769%2C1030&ssl=1 769w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?resize=526%2C705&ssl=1 526w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?resize=450%2C603&ssl=1 450w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Planetarium-at-Fernbank.jpg?w=896&ssl=1 896w” sizes=”(max-width: 224px) 100vw, 224px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block; height: auto;”>The Fernbank planetarium opens for evening and weekend community programs. Credit: Kelly JordanIt is a kind of theatrical way to teach, said Richard Williamon, Emory physics faculty emeritus who used to teach at Emory and Fernbank planetariums. But you can go back and forth, teach at the right speed for the students, go back to certain points.“After you capture them with the beauty and the mythology … something by which they can remember the sky, they’ll get out and start looking,” he said.And that’s just astronomy. He too talked about teaching math and arts too.“You can whet a student’s appetite for just about anything,” Williamon said.And since the building’s already there, he sees it as a great deal for APS.Mary Palmer wants to see the Harper-Archer planetarium re-opened, especially as the Douglass cluster is meant to specialize in “STEM” — “science, technology, engineering and math.” A variation of the term makes it “STEAM,” adding “arts.”When her kids were in APS, she said, she felt a calling to shift from IT work in the corporate world toward K-12 education, advocacy, watchdogging, supporting kids.“My having that academic focus and seeing from a STEM basis what all a planetarium could offer, and knowing that Harper-Archer is sitting in one of the most poverty-stricken, socially, economically challenged areas in Atlanta, I cared about that,” Palmer said.Williams is the founding board chair of a nonprofit that would be a sort of booster club for the planetarium, working on things like fundraising; and Palmer is one of her board members. The nonprofit puts the cost of salaries and running of the planetarium at $227,000 per year.Expensive, Williams admits; but that’s why she wants to get private organizations to help.Williams thought this was going to be the Harper-Archer planetarium’s year, that $2.3 million from an education sales tax would be used to renovate it and an adjacent theater. But now it’s unclear.On the same block as APS headquarters, one of many painted utility boxes Downtown gives an astronomy lesson. Credit: Maggie Lee ” data-medium-file=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?fit=1030%2C773&ssl=1″ src=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1″ alt=”On the same block as APS headquarters, one of many painted utility boxes Downtown gives an astronomy lesson. Credit: Maggie Lee” width=”298″ height=”224″ srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?resize=300%2C225&ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?resize=768%2C576&ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?resize=1030%2C773&ssl=1 1030w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?resize=705%2C529&ssl=1 705w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg?resize=450%2C338&ssl=1 450w, https://i2.wp.com/saportareport.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Eclipse-outside-APS.jpg” style=”max-width:100%;” />

Kwanzaa Celebration at Shrine of the Black Madonna

At the Shrine of the Black Madonna in West End, young people help Jumoke Ifetayo light the Kwanzaa candles for the second of seven days of celebration. 

Kwanzaa is started in 1965 by Dr. Maulana Karenga in Chicago.  It is celebrated December 26 – January 1.

The foundation of Kwanzaa are the Seven Principles, or Nguzo Saba. When Dr. Karenga created the kinaracelebration of Kwanzaa he wanted to reflect the best qualities and characteristics of the “first fruit” or harvest festivals that were celebrated throughout Africa. It was these qualities that established the Nguzo Saba, or Seven Principles of Kwanzaa. (Nguzo Saba is Kiswahili for Seven Principles).*

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“The children will carry on the traditions of the land. So we must teach them the history”, said the narrator.

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These children dance with the rattle instrument, the shekere,  as the narrator tells an African story with drums.

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Rev. Keith Slaughter (above), a WAOK talk show host is tonight’s speaker.  He gives the message entitled, “Stand Your Ground”, in celebration of Day 2, Kujichagulia, self-determination. ‘Stand not to kill people, but to claim what is rightfully ours, what we need…our fair share.  Be truthful and put on the full armour of God as you fight for justice in this world. Pray the righteous will be there for us and beware of the haters!’

Rev. Slaughter’s message was powerful, informative, passionate, on point and short!  He was definitely on his game!

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A packed crowd looks on at the Shrine of the Black Madonna during the 15th Annual Kwanzaa celebration at 960 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd.

There will be five more nights of Kwanzaa at the Shrine with speakers including Atlanta City Council President Felicia Moore on Saturday 2pm-6pm, and Rev. Derrick Rice on a Faith Panel on Tuesday, 4pm-8pm.  For more information, call (404) 549-8676 or (404) 444-6696.

Also, the Shrine has free Black History classes every Saturday from 1:30pm to 3:30pm.  Plan to attend with your family and friends.

*From:  http://www.holidays.net/kwanzaa/principles.htm

STEM Curriculum Not Concrete!!

 

Below is a list of APS Board members and others elected who should care about how this extra $2.4 million E-SPLOST funds are being spent.  As I mentioned, this School Board vote occurred Monday, Dec. 5.  With so much going on, the media did not do a story.
However, all metro Atlanta educators and residents should be ANGRY that for more than four years APS said they did not have funds to restore the Harper-Archer Middle School Planetarium and Theater.
Now that extra E/SPLOST funds are available, they have voted to use this $2.4 million to upgrade the building exterior (concrete), parking lot (asphalt), and windows (functional, not damaged; GA Power will fund).  Instead, these tax payer funds should be used for STEM/STEAM academic curriculum Resources for our kids…for access for all 52,000 APS students to have their Planetarium and Theater restored.
Please use, this list.  Wear it out!!  Copy and post this list on ALL your social media so people can express their outrage and DEMAND this $2.4 million be reallocated and spent on the four year old STEM/Planetarium curriculum plan that will help improve student academic achievement and test scores.
Let’s overwhelm their emails and phones all next week.  AND, do it again January 7-21 to as we honor Rev. Dr. M.L.King, Jr. We must persist for equity in education, not in concrete!!
This APS decision is NOT ACCEPTABLE!!
However, we can make it happen… WE CAN HAVE THIS DECISION REVERSED WHEN WE CONSISTENT WORK ON AND ISSUE:  Case in point…The Montgomery
Bus Boycott.
LET’S DO THIS!!
In Montgomery, they did not have social media.  We have social media.  LET’S USE IT TO HELP SAVE OUR KIDS by getting this STEM PROJECT funded!!
Thanks in Advance!!

—-

APS BOARD MEMBERS 2018-2021

Jason Esteves, Chair; At-large, 9

Jesteves@atlanta.k12.ga.us

404-802-2200 ofc      (404) 802-1204 fax

Cynthia Briscoe Brown, At-large; 8

Cbriscoe_brown@@atlanta.k12.ga.us

404-802-2297 ofc

404-376-6080 cell

Kandis Wood Jackson, At-large; 7

Kandis.woodjackson@atlanta.k12.ga.us

404-802-2296 ofc

Eshe’ Collins, District 6

Epcollins@atlantapublicschools.us

404-802-2295 ofc

770-765-3802 cell

Erika Y. Mitchell, District 5

Erika.mitchell@apsk12.org

404-802-2294 ofc vmail               404-709-5515 cell

Nancy M. Meister, vice chair; District 4

Nmeister@atlanta.k12.ga.us

404-802-2200 ofc vmail               404-488-9014 cell

Michelle D. Olympiadis, District 3

Michelle.olympiadis@apsk12.org

404-802-2292 ofc vmail               404-502-0825 cell

Byron D. Amos, District 2

Bamos@atlanta.k12.ga.us

404-802-2200 ofc vmail               404-587-6811 cell

Leslie Grant, District 1

Lgrant@atlantapublicschools.us

404-802-2255 ofc vmail               404-643-9652 cell

Dr. Meria Carstarphen, Superintendent 

Suptoffice@atlanta.k12.ga.us

404-802-2820 office

Other elected officials we can get to use their influence to get this STEM/Planetarium funded with our E-SPLOST tax dollars.  As elected officials, our tax dollars also pay their salaries:

State School Superintendent 

Richard Woods

404-657-1175 ofc           404-651-8737 fax

state.superintendent@doe.k12.ga.u

State Senator Horacena Tate

Horacena.tate@senate.ga.gov

404-463-8053 ofc            404-893-2119 cell

State Senator Nan Orrock

nan.orrock@senate.ga.gov

(404) 463-8054 ofc

State Senator Nikema Williams

nikema.williams@senate.ga.gov

(404) 656-5035 ofc

State Representative Sheila Jones

sheila.jones@house.ga.gov

404-656-0126 ofc

State Representative Pat Gardner

fran.gardner@house.ga.gov

(404) 656-0265 ofc

State Representative Marie Metze

marie.metze@house.ga.gov

(404) 656-6372 ofc

State Representative David Dreyer

david.dreyer@house.ga.gov

(404) 656-0265 ofc

State Representative Park Cannon

park.cannon@house.ga.gov

(404) 656-7859 ofc

U.S. Congressman John Lewis

john.lewis@mail.house.gov

aaron.ward@mail.house.gov 

(404) 659-0116 ofc

Atlanta Mayor 

Keisha Lance Bottoms

404-330-6100 ofc

Atlanta City Council President Felicia Moore

fmoore@atlantaga.gov

(404) 330-6052 ofc         (404) 739-9240 fax

Atlanta City Councilman Andre Dickens – Post 3 At-Large

Adickens@atlantaga.gov

(404) 330-6041 ofc         (404) 739-9250 fax

Atlanta City Councilman Matt Westmoreland – Post 2 Large

mwestmoreland@atlantaga.gov

(404) 330-6302 ofc         (404) 979-3682 fax

Atlanta City Councilman Michael Julian Bond – Post 1 At-Large

mbond@atlantaga.gov

(404) 330-6770 ofc         (404) 739-4852 fax

Atlanta City Councilwoman Andrea Boone

aboone@atlantaga.gov

(404) 330-6055 ofc         (404) 979-3680 fax

Fulton County Commission Chair Robb Pitts

robb.pitts@fultoncountyga.gov

(404) 613-2330

Fulton County Commissioner Emma Darnell

emma.darnell@fultoncountyga.gov

(404) 612-8222 ofc       (404) 224-3775 fax

Fulton County Commissioner Natalie Hall

natalie.hall@fultoncountyga.gov  

 404-612-8227  ofc

When Did Saggin’ Pants Really Start?

Dont just do what others are doing to fit in or because it’s a trend.  Do your research.  More times than not you will find it is not new.  Just new to you!

As I talked to Kristen, my friend in Phoenix, about the movie Green Book, She asked if I heard about the slavery connection to saggin’ pants.  Well here it is:

Not a prison trend.  Not A Trend That Started In The 80s Back in the late 80s and early 90s, the sagging trend was introduced by rappers like Ice-T and Too Short. Then, Kris Kross took things to a whole new level. Although the trend started in prison systems and correctional institutions around the country, soon, black youth on the outside began adopting the fashion trend. However, it’s much deeper than something you see on television in this day and age.

‘Breaking the Buck’

If you haven’t heard of the process of “breaking the buck,” you’ll never look at a man wearing sagging pants the same. According to diaryofanegress.com, the process was a heinous act used during times of slavery to break down defiant male slaves.  During this brutal process, the slave owners and Overseer would make an example of the slave in front of the entire slave congregation by beating him relentlessly. But unfortunately, that’s not the worst of the punishment. Then, they would cut down a tree and force the battered male slave over the tree stump with his britches removed so he’d be exposed for the entire slave congregation to see. “Buck Breaking” The slave master would then make an example out of the slave and promise others the act would be their fate for defiant behavior. The slave owner would then remove his own clothing and savagely sodomize the slave in front of his family – wife and children – and his friends. But sadly things didn’t stop there. Slave masters were also known to invite their associates from other plantations to participate. Then the owner would make the slave wear his pants below his bottom letting others know that he was broken. It is also noted that the defiant slave’s male children were required to be front and center while the horrific acts were taking place in an effort to break them down mentally at an early age as they witnessed their father’s humiliation. Sadly, the process was successful. In fact, the disturbing process evolved into a “Sex Farm” practice where slaves were put on display for the twisted sexual desires of homosexual slave owners.

Read the full article at: https://www.theblackloop.com/many-think-sagging-pants-started-prison-come-place-much-worst/